Battery standard ratings usually refer to the country of origin for that battery and/or a specific battery type that is unique in style.
Essentially the standardized coding should make finding the correct battery a lot more straightforward.
In Europe, German DIN standards are used. In Asia, the Japanese JIS standard is used.
Given the majority of cars in New Zealand are of Japanese origin, we therefore follow their battery groupings. Bearing in mind there will always be outliers, but this would cover 99% of car batteries in New Zealand

JAPANESE INDUSTRY STANDARD (JIS) CODES EXPLAINED

 

How to read JIS (Japanese Industrial Standard) code for battery type information? 

The top of the battery indicates the type and kind of different batteries. The JSI system helps you compare the performance and size differences of different car batteries making it easier to choose the perfect car battery for your vehicle.

1: STANDARD BATTERY OR AGM INDICATOR

S Prefix indicates AGM, if it doesn’t have an ‘S’ it’s a standard battery.

2: RATING THE PERFORMANCE (NO UNIT SYMBOL)

Performance rating indicates the starting performance capacity or overall performance of a car battery. The greater the performance of a car battery, the larger the number of its performance will be. (Below 50 = 2 steps, 50 and above = 5 steps)

3: LENGTH OF THE SHORT SIDE (CATEGORIES IN THE JIS STANDARD ARE DETERMINED BY THE BOX HEIGHT AND WIDTH)

It is symbolized with alphabets from A to H, and the increase in is shown from A to H. The unit of measurement used is millimetres (MM).

4: LENGTH

This is a rough estimate of the length of the box within 2 or 3 centimetres (cm).

5: POSITION OF POLARITY

This shows where the battery’s positive and negative polarities  (terminals) are located. R for right and  L. for left 

What are car battery size groups and how do I know which is the right group for my car?

If you’re in New Zealand, this is not something you need to know about, the BCI group sizes are the system employed in America.  The American BCI system assigns numbers and letters for each car battery size group  and is by and large based on the vehicle’s make, model and engine size.

If you’ve got an American car, you may find this useful:

Some examples of common BCI Group sizes are:

Group Size                                         

Group size 24/24F – Top terminal

Car battery group size commonly found in the following cars

Honda, Lexus, Toyota, Nissan

Group size 35 – Top terminal

Car battery group size commonly found in the following cars

Most late model Honda, Toyota, Nissan and Subaru’s

Group size 48 – Top terminal

Car battery group size commonly found in the following cars

BMW, Ford, Chevy, Cadillac

Group size 75 – Side terminal

Car battery group size commonly found in the following cars

Most Dodge, GM, Chrysler’s

Group size 34/78 – Dual terminal

Car battery group size commonly found in the following cars

Some Dodge, GM, Chrysler’s

Group size 65 – Top Terminal

Car battery group size commonly found in the following cars

Large body Ford’s, Lincoln

Where car batteries are concerned battery industry standards such as DIN standards, JIS standards and battery size groupings are used to classify car batteries. Each car battery is assigned a code that refers to things like the physical size of the battery (height x length x width), polarity or terminal type and location of positive and negative battery posts, amongst other information.

Some cars will accommodate more than type of car battery (especially in the case where there have been modifications made to the vehicle), but it goes without saying (well hopefully it does) that it’s important to use a car battery that was intended for your vehicle.

You can normally look up your car battery requirements in your owner’s manual, if you no longer have this you can generally find it labelled on the front or top of the battery.

If in any doubt please make sure to check with the battery experts at the Battery Warehouse or use our Battery Measurement Tool on www.batterywarehouse.net.nz  before buying your car battery. Fitting the wrong battery could mean the early failure of the car battery, or worse, it could  damage the charging system, starter motor, and other electrical components.

Need help or expert advice on buying the best car battery for your car?  Drop in and see us at the Battery Warehouse to get your car battery installed today or give us a call on 0800 228 748.